When archaeological features are buried they can affect the growth rate of the crops above them. The presence of features such as buried wall foundations or compacted floor surfaces produce a reduction in the soil depth and lower moisture levels than the surrounding land. Crops immediately above these features tend to have reduced growth rates in comparison to the plants above of no archaeological activity, producing “negative cropmarks”.

In contrast areas where ditches, pits and other features have been dug into the subsoil become filled over time. This relative increase in soil depth and the potential to provide increased soil moisture enables the crops above to grow higher and ripen later than the plants around them, producing “positive cropmarks”.  Both negative and positive cropmarks are more easily detected from the air and are usually visible during times of drought when crops are at maximum stress.

The articles have been written by Arcland members about Cropmarks.

 

Crop marks WEB.

  • Mapping

    Mapping Interpretation is the first step in converting the information on aerial photographs to maps

  • Cropmarks

    When archaeological features are buried they can affect the growth rate of the crops above them. The

  • Topography

    This part of the website will be updated with new content on the extraction of topographical data an

  • Landscape

    One of the activities that ArcLand is interested in fostering during the life-time of its project is

  • GIS Integration

    This part of the website will be updated with new content on the integration and integrated interpre

  • Shadowmarks

    Archaeological topographic features which exist in the present landscape such as banks and ditches b

  • Soilmarks

    Over time human activity has the potential to disturb the local soil profile. As humans dig pits or

EU-Culture-600pxThe project ArchaeoLandscape Europe is funded by the European Union within the framework of the Culture 2007-2013 framework (CU7-MULT7, Strand 1.1 Multi-Annual Cooperation Projects). This website reflects the views of the authors, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.

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